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Shacman, NZ’s 18th HD truck make, launched

Shacman, NZ’s 18th HD truck make, launched

NZ Truck & Driver News

 March 2021   

A new Chinese truck has been launched in New Zealand – Shacman becoming the 18th make currently offering a heavy-duty model here.

Shacman Trucks NZ showed off three 440-horsepower/328 kilowatt Cummins ISM-engined X3000 models at the late January launch.

The tipper and two readymix concrete trucks were, the company confirmed, the only trucks so far in the country – and two of them had already been sold before the launch event.

But Shacman NZ general manager Bobby Khan says that there’s a short lead-time on orders – three to four months.

In addition to the models already here, NZ buyers can order a 660hp/492kW tractor unit version of the X3000…and a medium-duty L3000 12-tonner (with examples of the latter expected to be in NZ by this month).

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A new Chinese truck has been launched in New Zealand – Shacman becoming the 18th make currently offering a heavy-duty model here.

Shacman Trucks NZ showed off three 440-horsepower/328 kilowatt Cummins ISM-engined X3000 models at the late January launch.

The tipper and two readymix concrete trucks were, the company confirmed, the only trucks so far in the country – and two of them had already been sold before the launch event.

But Shacman NZ general manager Bobby Khan says that there’s a short lead-time on orders – three to four months.

In addition to the models already here, NZ buyers can order a 660hp/492kW tractor unit version of the X3000…and a medium-duty L3000 12-tonner (with examples of the latter expected to be in NZ by this month).

According to ChinaTrucks.com, Shacman ranked fourth on China’s HD truck market last year – in early December it was on track to sell around 227,000 trucks, in a total market estimated to reach 1.623 million sales for the year.

Shacman is made by Shaanxi Automobile Holding Group, which began commercial heavy-duty truck production in 1968. The make is now sold in more than 90 countries, but NZ may be its most sophisticated truck market. 

Shacman NZ director Wei Wang says: “I think that Chinese products are improving very fast and we can now compare with the Japanese – and even with European – because in China labour is cheap. 

“Maybe a Euro truck is $400,000, but we pay $200,000 for something that does the same job.

“I saw the issues that FUSO and Sino (Sinotruk) have had in terms of driver comfort and robustness: Our Shacman trucks are well-specced and well-connected.”

Khan points out that the trucks have “Cummins and Eaton powertrains and good componentry. Shacman has brought the Americans and Europeans together and assembled it all in China.”

He adds: “Definitely, we’re not here to compete with the Europeans or Americans – but there is a place for Chinese vehicles. Why I say that is the rates are coming down and you can’t buy a Rolls-Royce if you’re only charging someone $170 to cart a container to Tauranga. So there is a place in the market for cheaper vehicles.”

He says that the make has a variety of benefits: “First and foremost is the price – because, if it’s not cheap, why would anyone buy our product. 

“Then we have technologies that are similar or better than the Americans. And lastly there’s the powertrain, which is well-renowned and has great support around the country.”

Khan believes that the Shacman models will compete with fellow-Chinese make Sinotruk – “and the Japanese (makes) to some extent…. Sinotruk have done very well, but they’ve also sold a lot of trucks to themselves. 

“We have to be realistic: Shacman is made in China and it’s not a proven product here yet – we have to prove ourselves in everything. Sales, service and parts.”

He says Shacman so far has two dealers in Christchurch and one in Rotorua – and is close to finalising others in Hamilton, Tauranga, Wellington and Palmerston North.

Wei says Shacman NZ flew NZ Transport Agency and VTNZ staff to China to visit the factory – to ensure the trucks comply in NZ.

Khan, who says he worked for MAN for 30 years, says the NZ distributor’s small team is “here to sell. We want trucks here, trucks on the water and trucks being manufactured.”

He says the lead times on orders is short – “and there is no problem with supply: They can make the NZ market’s numbers before morning tea!”

An initial supply of spare parts is already in NZ, he says, with the next (expanded) shipment on the way.

Khan says that this year the company hopes to sell “around a minimum of 50 L3000s. The Xs – around, hopefully, 10 or 20. We’d love to sell more but we have to be realistic. We are over the moon for selling two this quickly.”

Next year, he says, that might increase by 5-10% for each model: “We are looking at this long term. We can’t do this overnight.”  


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