NZ Truck & Driver News

 

NZ Truck & Driver News

 July 2021   

Manufacturers of heavy trucks have traditionally tried to make them quieter...but now Volvo is adding sound to some of its models!

The company has developed an acoustic alert system with unique sounds for its electric trucks, making pedestrians, cyclists and other road users aware of the approach of the otherwise near-silent vehicles.  

There will be five different sounds – one for slowing down (which sounds like wind blowing through a pipe or tube), another for idling (like a musical note) and one for reversing (a repetitive “dong” sound – though nothing near as obtrusive as the high-pitched beeping used now for reversing trucks). 

Moving forward is signalled by a tone that’s like a gong, and higher speeds produce a sound something like a distant train or plane.

The sounds are designed to not penetrate through walls, to allow for quiet nighttime deliveries and contribute to better working conditions. They have been developed to meet a requirement that all new electric vehicles in the EU have to emit a certain sound level when travelling at speeds below 20km/h. 

The level required depends on the speed and gets higher as it increases. At 20K it should be at least 56 decibels. The US has similar legislation for vehicles when driving 30km/h or slower.  

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Manufacturers of heavy trucks have traditionally tried to make them quieter...but now Volvo is adding sound to some of its models!

The company has developed an acoustic alert system with unique sounds for its electric trucks, making pedestrians, cyclists and other road users aware of the approach of the otherwise near-silent vehicles.  

There will be five different sounds – one for slowing down (which sounds like wind blowing through a pipe or tube), another for idling (like a musical note) and one for reversing (a repetitive “dong” sound – though nothing near as obtrusive as the high-pitched beeping used now for reversing trucks). 

Moving forward is signalled by a tone that’s like a gong, and higher speeds produce a sound something like a distant train or plane.

The sounds are designed to not penetrate through walls, to allow for quiet nighttime deliveries and contribute to better working conditions. They have been developed to meet a requirement that all new electric vehicles in the EU have to emit a certain sound level when travelling at speeds below 20km/h. 

The level required depends on the speed and gets higher as it increases. At 20K it should be at least 56 decibels. The US has similar legislation for vehicles when driving 30km/h or slower.  


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