NZ Truck & Driver News

 
Driverless truck working

Driverless truck working

NZ Truck & Driver News

 February 2019   
The Swedish T-pod autonomous electric truck has started work…within a big logistics centre.
And German logistics giant DB Schenker and truck manufacturer Einride are confident that the first commercialisation of the driverless T-pod will soon lead to it carting freight on public roads…in what they say will be a world first.

The cabless 7.5 tonne six-wheeler is operating at a DB Schenker facility in Jönköping, central Sweden, almost continuously carting freight between two warehouses.

It can be supervised remotely by a human operator and thus is rated Level 4 Autonomous (rather than the absolutely autonomous Level 5) – but its Nvidia Drive platform includes a powerful graphic card which processes high resolution visual data from the sensors and radar in real time, so it can operate autonomously.

Doing away with a cab allows the T-pod to be smaller, with additional payload capacity and flexibility, with lower production and operating costs. It also optimises energy consumption, says Einride.

A fleet of T-pods, it says, could be co-ordinated by an intelligent computerised routing system, optimising delivery times, battery life and energy consumption – "making road freight transportation as efficient as possible."

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The Swedish T-pod autonomous electric truck has started work…within a big logistics centre.
And German logistics giant DB Schenker and truck manufacturer Einride are confident that the first commercialisation of the driverless T-pod will soon lead to it carting freight on public roads…in what they say will be a world first.
The cabless 7.5 tonne six-wheeler is operating at a DB Schenker facility in Jönköping, central Sweden, almost continuously carting freight between two warehouses.
It can be supervised remotely by a human operator and thus is rated Level 4 Autonomous (rather than the absolutely autonomous Level 5) – but its Nvidia Drive platform includes a powerful graphic card which processes high resolution visual data from the sensors and radar in real time, so it can operate autonomously.
Doing away with a cab allows the T-pod to be smaller, with additional payload capacity and flexibility, with lower production and operating costs. It also optimises energy consumption, says Einride.
A fleet of T-pods, it says, could be co-ordinated by an intelligent computerised routing system, optimising delivery times, battery life and energy consumption – "making road freight transportation as efficient as possible."
The remote operator could supervise up to 10 vehicles at a time, it adds – taking over if necessary to help the T-pods negotiate difficult terrain or unusual situations.
DB Schenker CEO Jochen Thewes says that his company is "working at full speed on sustainable and innovative logistics. Autonomous driving will become increasingly important for this.
"Together with Einride, we want to bring the first autonomous, fully electric truck onto public roads in the near future and thus set new standards for tomorrow's logistics." 
Einride CEO and founder Robert Falck adds: "Heavy road transport is responsible for a substantial part of global CO2 emissions. By substituting electricity for diesel, we reduce CO2 emissions by 90%. 
"We are happy and grateful that DB Schenker has chosen to be part of this revolution, disrupting a huge global market."
Einride and DB Schenker's partnership agreement is to develop the pilot operation in Jönköping… with an option for additional pilots internationally.
Another Einride vehicle, the T-log, is designed to autonomously haul up to 16 tonnes of logs on forest roads.  


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