NZ Truck & Driver News

 
Electric sideloader for NZ

Electric sideloader for NZ

NZ Truck & Driver News

 April 2021   

The world’s first electric sideloader has been launched by Hammar – and could be working in New Zealand within a year.

A prototype has been trialled with several customers in Australia over the past seven years – the Swedish company having now decided to put the electric sideloader into production.

It says it’s a milestone in offering green, environmentally-friendly alternatives in the sideloader industry.

And Hammar NZ managing director Fred Sandberg believes NZ operators will be early adopters of the zero-emissions container lifter: “I can confirm we will be offering the electrified sideloader option for the NZ market – and we do have a customer who is very interested in electric vehicles that we are talking to.”

Hammar says the electric sideloader offers numerous advantages over diesel-powered lifters, including zero emissions, a healthier working environment, lower operating costs, a lower weight and significantly lower noise levels. Growing regulation to reduce noise and emissions in heavily-populated urban areas add to the attractiveness of the electric sideloader.

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The world’s first electric sideloader has been launched by Hammar – and could be working in New Zealand within a year.

A prototype has been trialled with several customers in Australia over the past seven years – the Swedish company having now decided to put the electric sideloader into production.

It says it’s a milestone in offering green, environmentally-friendly alternatives in the sideloader industry.

And Hammar NZ managing director Fred Sandberg believes NZ operators will be early adopters of the zero-emissions container lifter: “I can confirm we will be offering the electrified sideloader option for the NZ market – and we do have a customer who is very interested in electric vehicles that we are talking to.”

Hammar says the electric sideloader offers numerous advantages over diesel-powered lifters, including zero emissions, a healthier working environment, lower operating costs, a lower weight and significantly lower noise levels. Growing regulation to reduce noise and emissions in heavily-populated urban areas add to the attractiveness of the electric sideloader.

The application is well-suited to electric power as the actual daily working time of the cranes is quite brief – with most time spent travelling to and from loading or unloading locations, says Hammar. The actual lifts only average two to five minutes each.

A fully-charged electric power pack (ePP) provides sufficient stored energy for repeat lifts of 35 tonne containers. It can be charged by the truck while driving to the next lift and can also be charged by plugging into a 230-volt source at a base. 

Hammar CEO and owner Bengt-Olof Hammar says: “We have a customer in Australia who doesn’t have to stop to charge the sideloader at all – and the charging during transport is enough to last for a whole week without plug-in charging.

“This same scenario will apply to many of our customers. In combination with plug-in charging, the ePP will work great for anyone with some transport distance.” 

Denmark has become the second country to see the Hammar electric sideloader put to work – Ancotrans, the country’s biggest sideloader operator, explaining that it decided to go electric “because it is the right solution, both for the climate and for the working environment of the driver,” says COO Mogens Røigaard.

“The lower sound levels, no particles and cleaner air when working in confined spaces are all important factors.”  


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