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New Euro emissions regs “highly ambitious”

New Euro emissions regs “highly ambitious”

NZ Truck & Driver News

 April 2019   
Europe's first-ever CO2 emissions levels for trucks are "highly ambitious" and "highly demanding," truckmakers say.

The recommended regulations will specify a 15% reduction in CO2 emissions from 2019 levels by 2025….and a 30% cut by 2030.

The European Automobile Manufacturers' Association (ACEA) says that achieving the targets "does not depend solely on the commercial vehicle industry…"

And ACEA secretary general Erik Jonnaert calls on EU member states "to urgently step up their efforts to roll out the infrastructure required for charging and refuelling the alternatively-powered trucks which will need to be sold en masse if these targets are to be met." 

ACEA says data shows that there is currently no public charging or refuelling infrastructure suitable for electric or hydrogen trucks – and truck-specific filling stations for natural gas (CNG or LNG), is also minimal and "patchy" across Europe.

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Europe's first-ever CO2 emissions levels for trucks are "highly ambitious" and "highly demanding," truckmakers say.
The recommended regulations will specify a 15% reduction in CO2 emissions from 2019 levels by 2025….and a 30% cut by 2030.
The European Automobile Manufacturers' Association (ACEA) says that achieving the targets "does not depend solely on the commercial vehicle industry…"
And ACEA secretary general Erik Jonnaert calls on EU member states "to urgently step up their efforts to roll out the infrastructure required for charging and refuelling the alternatively-powered trucks which will need to be sold en masse if these targets are to be met." 
ACEA says data shows that there is currently no public charging or refuelling infrastructure suitable for electric or hydrogen trucks – and truck-specific filling stations for natural gas (CNG or LNG), is also minimal and "patchy" across Europe.
Part of the EU proposal would see mandatory sales quotas for zero-emission trucks that the EU institutions have agreed to introduce from 2025 onwards (via the 'benchmark' system).
Erik Jonnaert: "The introduction of a benchmark system for truck manufacturers totally ignores the demand side. We cannot expect transport operators to suddenly start buying electric or other alternatively-powered trucks if there is no business case for them and it is not possible to easily charge the vehicles along all major EU motorways. 
"Policymakers must act to ensure that the zero-emission trucks that manufacturers will be mandated to produce can actually be bought and operated by our customers."
Also, given that this is the first time the EU sets CO2 standards for trucks, "it's extremely worrying that many supportive measures that could contribute to reaching the targets" – including longer vehicle combinations and alternative fuels – have been deferred until at least 2025.
The EU says that truck manufacturers who don't comply with the new standards will be hit with financial penalties, in the form of excess emissions premiums.
But it also says it will strengthen incentives for manufacturers to build low emissions and zero emission trucks.
The truck CO2 emissions standards follow similar regulations on cars and light commercials, introduced last December – the tough regulations part of the EU's plan to combat global warming by slashing greenhouse gas emissions to a "net zero" level by 2050.  
The EU says that the truck CO2 emissions standards are "a further stepping stone for modernising the European mobility sector and preparing it for climate neutrality in the second half of the century." 
Its aim is to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% by 2030, while bringing fuel savings for transport operators and cleaner air for the European population. 
Volvo Trucks president Roger Alm says that "it's natural for the EU to now introduce limits on CO2 emissions."
But he adds: "In order to speed up the transition, we would however also like to see stronger financial incentives for the customers who take the lead and choose more climate-friendly vehicles."  


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